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Dell YouthConnect Application
Dell

April, 2011

We live in a global economy that is more connected than ever before. Education has changed with this, moving from a focus on core subjects and formal classrooms to applied learning that actively uses technology to enhance the learning experience. Learning now happens everywhere — at home, at school and in the community. Dell believes we are obligated to make technology easily accessible and provide the tools to use it.

We want to prepare young people for success personally and professionally through information and communications technology. Access to these tools — and knowing how to use them — provides new opportunities.

We make this happen through, Dell™ YouthConnect, which partners with nonprofit organizations to help underserved children. Dell YouthConnect is seeking innovative learning and technology-driven programs through a competitive grant process.

  • Beginning April 1, online applications will be accepted at http://www.easymatch.com/dellyouthconnect Entries must be received by May 16. For questions, contact dell@easymatch.com
  • Semifinalists will be selected no later than June 15. The selected will then initiate a formal proposal process through the Dell online application tool. Upon notification, selected semifinalists will be offered an opportunity to submit their full proposal and complete the formal Dell application. Semifinalists will be asked to present a 30-minute virtual presentation.
  • Recipients selected and notified no later than August 31.

Dell YouthConnect Impact

An effective Dell YouthConnect recipient will submit an application that has a program that focuses on preparing youth for success in a highly globalized, technological society at school, work and life through the development of information and communication technology (ICT) skills.

We will accomplish this by:

  • Access: Getting Dell technology/solutions into the hands of the most needy. Any Dell technology, solution or service may be used. Organizations that request more than half of their funding for Dell technology will be provided with strong consideration.
  • Learning: Providing opportunities to learn and acquire ICT skills. ICT skills are defined as: 
    • Critical thinking and problem solving
    • Innovation and creativity
    • Communication and collaboration
    • Technology literacy

Orientation Meetings:

Dell YouthConnect Charity Info Sessions

April 13: 12 noon, CDT
For audio: Call-in: 1-866-803-2143 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              1-866-803-2143      end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Passcode: DYC Charity

For visuals:
URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/dell/
Conference number: PG1953507
Audience passcode: DYC CHARITY

Participants can join the event directly at:
https://www.mymeetings.com/dell/index.php?i=PG1953507&p=DYC CHARITY&t=c

The line will max reach out at 250 participants. Please make sure to test the link beforehand because it may require you to download Microsoft software. If you are unable to attend this session, please try on April 20.


April 20: 12 noon, CDT
For audio: Call-in: 1-866-803-2143 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              1-866-803-2143      end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Passcode: DYC Charity

For visuals:
URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/dell/
Conference number: PG1953524
Audience passcode: DYC CHARITY

Participants can join the event directly at:
https://www.mymeetings.com/dell/index.php?i=PG1953524&p=DYC CHARITY&t=c

The line will max reach out at 250 participants. Please make sure to test the link beforehand because it may require you to download Microsoft software. If you are unable to attend this session, please listen to the replay available at www.dell.com/giving.


Dell YouthConnect Criteria

The following criteria will be considered in the selection of a Dell YouthConnect recipient:

  • Only qualified registered 501(c)3 public charities with high-quality programs and services, well-defined goals, technology savvy, a proven record of maximizing available resources and a reputation with regard to meeting objectives and reporting measured results may apply.
  • Program funding available up to $250,000, and all funding and/or in-kind contributions must be for direct programs (see exclusion list below). There is a minimum request of $25,000.
  • Programs must focus on an underserved community (such as gender, ethnicity, cultural, disability).
  • Programs must serve the most needy.
  • Organization must provide youth up to 23 years of age with direct programs and services.
  • Program must exclusively provide a Dell technology and/or technology solutions component.
  • Organization must be in an urban area near significant Dell population for employee engagement. Communities with a Dell site include (as of March 2011): Atlanta, Ga.; Buffalo Grove, Ill.; Austin/Round Rock, Texas; Eden Prairie; Minn.; Fremont, Calif.; Lincoln, Neb.; Nashville, Tenn.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; Miami, Fla.; Mountain View, Calif.: Nashua, N.H.; San Jose, Calif.; Peoria, Ill.; Santa Clara, Calif.; Fairfax, Va.; and, Washington, DC.
  • Funding requests cannot exceed 20 percent of an organization's total annual operating budget.
  • Grants must remain under the financial control of the applying organization and cannot be regranted in any way to any other charitable organization.
  • These are single-year partnership grants for the Fall 2011 through Summer 2012 school year and require two reports (midyear and final), which are meant to measure success to objectives.
  • Selected recipients will need to assign an English-speaking program manager to work with the Dell Regional Giving manager.
  • All applications and supporting materials must be in English.

Dell Giving grants do not extend to:

  • Any organization that is not a 501(c)3 public charity, including any other 501c status or entities with a 170 status
  • Individuals
  • Academic or research projects
  • Fundraising activities such as galas, benefits and dinners
  • Goodwill advertising, souvenir journals
  • Special events such as conference, symposia
  • Public schools or school systems, fundraisers, scholarships or stipends (unless applying through qualified 501c3)
  • Private foundations or donor-advised funds.
  • Colleges/universities (unless applying through qualified 501c3)
  • Building costs and upkeep
  • Capital campaigns, endowments and annual general operations
  • Sponsorships, marketing opportunities or event fundraisers
  • Sports events and organizations
  • Political activities, causes, candidates, organizations, campaigns and lobbying efforts
  • Proposals that fall outside of our stated funding area
  • Multiyear grants
  • Programs proposed by religious, political or sectarian organization. Faith-based programs may be eligible if beneficiaries are not encouraged to learn about, adhere to or convert to doctrine and only if the organization can verify through readily available public documents that the program:
    • is open to people of any faith or no faith
    • does not subject participants to proselytizing
    • requires no participation in religious activities
  • Organizations trading for profit or intending to redistribute grant awards
  • Organization that advocate, support or practice activities inconsistent with Dell nondiscrimination policies whether based on race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, disability age or status as a protected veteran.

Skills

Dell YouthConnect recipients will prioritize the following skills in the development and execution of their programs:

Skill Description Activities for Measurement

Creativity and Innovation

Creativity and innovation help drive the development of practical, analytical, creative analysis. Successful individuals are those who have “creative skills, to produce a vision for how they intend to make the world a better place for everyone; analytical intellectual skills, to assess their vision and those of others; practical intellectual skills, to carry out their vision and persuade people of its value.” (Need to attribute quote to Robert Sternberg) Creativity thrives on freedom and friction and diversity to spark new ideas and gain new perspectives. Innovation keeps the creative spark alive and makes it useful for the wider world by drawing on practical sorts of expertise, such as replication and distribution of, and dissemination of information about the object of creation. (Attribution?)

Think Creatively
  • Use a wide range of idea creation techniques (such as brainstorming).
  • Create new and worthwhile ideas (both incremental and radical concepts).
  • Elaborate, refine, analyze and evaluate their own ideas to improve and maximize creative efforts.

Work Creatively with Others

  • Develop, implement and communicate new ideas to others effectively.
  • Be open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives; incorporate group input and feedback into the work.
  • Demonstrate originality and inventiveness in work and understand the real world limits to adopting new ideas.
  • View failure as an opportunity to learn; understand that creativity and innovation is a long-term, cyclical process of small successes and frequent mistakes.

Implement Innovations

  • Act on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the field, in which the innovation will occur.

Communication and Collaboration

Expressing thoughts clearly, crisply articulating opinions, communicating coherent instructions, motivating others through powerful speech — these skills have always been valued in the workplace and in public life. Communication competencies such as clearly articulating ideas through speaking and writing are related to collaboration skills, such as working effectively with diverse teams, making necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal and assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work. (Attribution?)

Communicate Clearly

  • Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts.
  • Listen effectively to decipher meaning, including knowledge, values, attitudes and intentions.
  • Use communication for a range of purposes (e.g. to inform, instruct, motivate and persuade).
  • Use multiple media and technologies and know how to judge their effectiveness before while assess their impact as well.
  • Communicate effectively in diverse environments (including multilingual)
Collaborate With Others
  • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively and respectfully with diverse teams.
  • Exercise flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary
    compromises to accomplish a common goal.
  • Assume shared responsibility for collaborative work and value the individual contributions made by each team member.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

To successfully solve a problem, we must first be able to formulate it as a problem — understand what makes up its essential elements. Thus, the key lies in critical thinking skills. Critical thinking and problem solving draws on a classic learning model, known as the Blooms taxonomy, which classifies intellectual activity into six levels of successively greater cognitive complexity: knowledge, understanding, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Problem solving is generally understood to be the process of applying scientific and engineering methods of defining and describing a problem, generating potential solutions, and implementing, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the selected intervention. (Attribution?)

Reason Effectively

  • Use various types of reasoning (both inductive, deductive) as appropriate to the situation.
Use Systems Thinking
  • Analyze how parts of a whole interact with each other to produce overall outcomes in complex systems.
Make Judgments and Decisions
  • Effectively analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims and beliefs.
  • Analyze and evaluate major alternative points of view.
  • Synthesize and make connections between information and arguments.
  • Interpret information and draw conclusions based on the best analysis.
  • Reflect critically on learning experiences and processes.
Solve Problems
  • Solve different kinds of nonfamiliar problems in both conventional and innovative ways.
  • Identify and ask significant questions that clarify various points of view and lead to better solutions.


Technology Literacy


People in the 21st century live in a technology and media-suffused environment, marked by various characteristics, including: 1) access to an abundance of information, 2) rapid changes in technology tools and 3) the ability to collaborate and make individual contributions on an unprecedented scale. To be effective in the 21st century, citizens and workers must be able to exhibit a range of functional and critical thinking skills related to technology literacy. It’s important, though, to realize that this does not mean teaching technology for its own sake — but rather applying appropriate technologies to instructional tasks to enrich the learning of both traditional and 21st century content. Information communication and technology (ICT) literacy depends on the skillful use of information resources, but it is also built around a deep understanding of the “grammar” of technology. Just as a traditionally literate person can fluently incorporate a new vocabulary into her speech, so an ICT-literate person can fluidly master new technologies to enhance her work and personal life. (Attribution?)

INFORMATION LITERACY

Access and Evaluate Information
  • Access information efficiently (time) and effectively (sources).
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
Use and Manage Information
  • Use information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand.
  • Manage the flow of information from a wide variety of sources.
  • Apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information.

MEDIA LITERACY
Analyze Media

  • Understand both how and why media messages are constructed, and for what purposes.
  • Examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points
    of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors.
  • Apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of media.
Create Media Products
  • Understand and utilize the most appropriate media creation tools, characteristics and conventions.
  • Understand and effectively utilize the most appropriate expressions and interpretations in diverse, multicultural environments
    ICT (Information, Communications and Technology).
LITERACY
Apply Technology Effectively
  • Use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information.
  • Use digital technologies (computers, PDAs, media players, GPS), communication/networking tools and social networks appropriately to access, manage, integrate, evaluate and create information to successfully function in a knowledge economy.
  • Apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information technologies.


APPLICATION

To apply for the Dell YouthConnect program, click here.

You will need the following information to fill out the application.

General information about your organization including:

 

  • Name:
  • Address:
  • Executive Director and Grant Coordinator:
  • Name and Contacts of Organization:
  • Main Phone:
  • Organization Website Address:
  • Mission Statement:
  • Date Founded:
  • Evidence of the Impact of Your Organization (250 words maximum):
  • EIN #:
  • Have you received previous funding from Dell? If yes, please explain.

You will also be asked some general questions that include:

  • Program Title:
  • Program Start Date:
  • Program End Date:
  • Describe Your Program:
  • Grant Funding Requested:
  • Are you interested in receiving any portion of the Dell grant in technology/solutions? If yes, please describe the Dell technology and/or Dell solution or service you are countering for this program.
  • “Elevator pitch” of your program in 100 words or less.
  • What is the learning opportunity your program is addressing?
  • How does your program address the learning opportunity?
  • How does this program align to Dell’s funding area of: Preparing youth for success in a highly globalized, technological society at school, work and life through the development of information and communication technology (ICT) skills (200 words or less)?
  • Which populations does this program serve (include County and City names)?
  • How many children do you anticipate the program will impact?
  • Please describe how this program serves the most needy and/or underserved community.
  • Please describe your program’s logic model — that is, provide information that describes through words or images how your program works — how it is expected to work, what activities need to come before others and desired.
  • Be as specific as possible. Express your information in a SMART manner — specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and within a specific timeframe.
  • Why is your organization the most qualified to achieve your proposed outcomes and impact?
  • How do you plan to measure your success?
  • How do you envision engaging Dell team members with your organization and this program?
  • Do you currently have any Dell team members engaged with your organization? If so, please list their names and titles.

Dell location

  • Organization must be in an urban area near significant Dell population for employee engagement. Communities with a Dell site include (as of March 2011): Atlanta, Ga.; Buffalo Grove, Ill.; Austin/Round Rock, Texas; Chicago, IL; Eden Prairie; Minn.; Fremont, Calif.; Lincoln, Neb.; Nashville, Tenn.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; Miami, Fla.; Myrtle Beach, Fla.; Mountain View, Calif.: Nashua, N.H.; San Jose, Calif.; Plano, Texas; Peoria, Ill.; Providence, Rhode Island; Santa Clara, Calif.; Fairfax, Va.; and Washington.
Visit http://content.dell.com/us/en/corp/d/corp-comm/dell-youthconnect-application-us.aspx

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