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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

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Chemist to shoot iron bullets at cancer - UTSA receives grqant of $200,000
UTSA

December, 2010

UTSA chemist Donald Kurtz wins $200,000 to research the possibility

Lutcher Brown Distinguished Chair Donald Kurtz in the UTSA Department of Chemistry has been selected to receive $199,906 from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to develop a novel approach to delivering iron at toxic levels to kill cancer cells and tumors. The two-year research project is considered “High Impact High Risk” and, if successful, could have a tremendous impact on cancer therapy.

“Iron is essential for all cells in the body to function properly and is safe up to certain levels; however, the cells’ iron transfer process is highly regulated,” said Kurtz. “If we overload cells or tissues with iron, it becomes toxic. Our goal is to develop a method for delivering iron at toxic levels specifically to cancer cells.”

Over the next two years, Kurtz and his research team will focus on developing a photochemical or light-activated cancer therapy. The treatment will be driven by a nano-scale protein scaffold filled with approximately 2,000 iron atoms in its hollow center. The scaffold will include peptides on its outer shell that will allow it to be recognized specifically by cancer cells. The peptides would make the scaffold bind to the cancer cells like Velcro.

Once researchers deliver the iron-loaded scaffold to cancer cells, they will zap the scaffold with tissue-penetrating, near-infra-red light. The light treatment will cause the scaffold to release its iron into the cells. The released iron will induce the production of free radicals, which, at sufficiently high levels, will overwhelm the cell’s anti-oxidant capacity, thereby killing the cells.  The peptide on the outer shell of the protein scaffold can be varied to target specific types of cancers, such as breast or prostate.

“The basic idea is to use light as the trigger to shoot iron out of our protein scaffold and into the cancer cells,” said Kurtz. “Think of it as shooting iron bullets to kill cancer.”

Kurtz joined UTSA’s faculty in 2006 after serving for 20 years on the chemistry faculty at the University of Georgia. He is a specialist in bioinorganic chemistry and studies metalloenzymes such as non-heme iron enzymes at the molecular level.

            Established by Texas voters in 2007, CPRIT will invest up to $3 billion for groundbreaking cancer research, prevention program and services in Texas.

The University of Texas at San Antonio is one of the fastest growing higher education institutions in Texas and one of nine academic universities and six health institutions in the UT System. As a multicultural institution, UTSA aims to be a national research university providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

UTSA serves more than 30,300 students in 65 bachelor’s, 49 master’s and 21 doctoral degree programs in the colleges of Architecture, Business, Education and Human Development, Engineering, Honors, Liberal and Fine Arts, Public Policy, Sciences and Graduate School.  Founded in 1969, UTSA is an intellectual and creative resource center and a socioeconomic development catalyst for Texas and beyond. For more information, visit www.utsa.edu/today.

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