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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

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Ewing Halsell Foundation Gives $287,050 to UTSA for GE2MS Teacher Prep Program
UTSA

October, 2010

The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) announced today that it has received a two-year, $287,050 grant from the San Antonio-based Ewing Halsell Foundation to support its Generating Educational Excellence in Mathematics and Science (GE2MS) program, which recruits and prepares science and math students to become effective educators.

A partnership between UTSA’s College of Sciences and College of Education and Human Development, the GE2MS Teaching Program features an interdisciplinary curriculum that allows undergraduates to earn their teaching credentials while earning their math or science degrees. Through its partnership with San Antonio public school districts, the program gives students a chance to visit classrooms, attend seminars and network with new and seasoned teachers as they prepare to enter the field.

Through the generous support of the Ewing Halsell Foundation, up to 50 GE2MS students will receive $3,000 scholarships between now and the spring 2012 semester to complete their student teaching. The funding is critical for many, who expect to lose their financial aid while they student teach, because the responsibility prohibits them from taking additional courses and achieving full-time status to qualify for financial aid.

In addition, the foundation’s gift will fund:

·         three education professionals, who will regularly observe and communicate with new and student teachers to ensure they are successful in the classroom

·         a two-day symposium, which includes an iPod Touch for 25 new teachers and classroom technology training

·         25 new teachers to attend a statewide math and science conference covering an array of topics that will strengthen their teaching skills

·         15 new teachers to take 18 graduate credit hours in a secondary math or science subject, making them eligible to teach dual subject positions, which will become critical in 2011 when San Antonio high schools begin to require seniors take four years of math or science

At a luncheon honoring the Ewing Halsell Foundation, GE2MS student Adam Eannarino summed up the impact of the gift.

“This funding will allow us to develop ourselves and focus on developing our skills in the classroom,” said Eannarino. “Many of us have families and kids. Instead of waiting tables or pumping gas in the evenings after our student teaching, this means we get to go home and be parents and spouses.”

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The University of Texas at San Antonio is one of the fastest growing higher education institutions in Texas and one of nine academic universities and six health institutions in the UT System.  As a multicultural institution, UTSA aims to be a national research university providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

 

            UTSA serves more than 30,300 students in 65 bachelor’s, 49 master’s and 21 doctoral degree programs in the colleges of Architecture, Business, Education and Human Development, Engineering, Honors, Liberal and Fine Arts, Public Policy, Sciences and Graduate School.  Founded in 1969, UTSA is an intellectual and creative resource center and a socioeconomic development catalyst for Texas and beyond.  More information online at www.utsa.edu/today.



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